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Newsletter January 2020 | Early Life Psych

FOCUS ON MENTAL HEALTH – SETTING GOALS

By the time January comes around, people start to think about the resolutions they’ve made last year. As we remind ourselves of the commitment we swore not to give up this time, it can be overwhelming if we’ve only made it to February and had suddenly forgotten about an important goal. If your kids fall into the same pattern, then it may affect their perception of goal-keeping and success. Teaching them now about the importance of following through with a goal, can help them learn responsibility and accountability. Most people give up their new goals within the first 14 days. The unfortunate thing is that it normally takes 15 days to form a new habit. If you set a goal to write in your journal every day, and you make it 14 days, keeping it up for just one more day can help reinforce your commitment. The same goes for your children. If they set a goal to do their homework for an hour a day, make sure that they keep it up for that one extra day.

PARENTING TIP –HOW TO HELP YOUR FAMILY KEEP THEIR NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS

“All you have to do is stick to it,” you may tell your child. We all know what they’re thinking: That is way easier said than done, and it usually is. To help your child keep their goals, here are a few tips:
1. After making a goal in January, try asking your child how they’re doing on the first of every month if they haven’t done as well as they had hoped, use this time to make another goal to do better for this month. If they have done well, maybe consider forming a new goal and keep track of their success. This way the goal-making and keeping mentality is reinforced.
2. When helping your child come up with a goal, make sure it is something specifically tailored to them. If your child has a hard time in school, look for the catalyst that holds them back. Is it the amount of time spent doing homework? Or do they have a hard time paying attention in class? Whatever it is, identify the main complication, and set a goal that will help them overcome it.
3. Find a goal that interests them. Do they need more hobbies? Do they want to learn about something new and exciting like a new place or animal they’ve never heard of? If there is a goal that gets them excited, then they are far more likely to stick with it.
4. Accountability can’t be stressed enough. Doing something on your own is ALWAYS harder. Have your child find someone they can keep updated about their progress. A parent, sibling, friend, or maybe a teacher might be willing to be invested in their goal.
5. Try introducing S.M.A.R.T. goals to the family. Having a structured layout will make the goal seem much easier to accomplish. S.M.A.R.T. stands for specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and timely. It will help with all of the tips above as well. Remember that goalkeeping helps teach responsibility, and it can be fun, too! If you make individual and family goals, it can bring your family even closer together and teach important life lessons.

GROUPS

TBA.
SPEAK TO YOUR CHILD’S THERAPIST FOR DETAILS

PARENTING SEMINARS

FREE – OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
– Parenting meeting: New Year’s Resolutions January 9 @ 12pm
– Self Love Parent meeting, February 6 @ 12 pm
* Childcare is available

THANK YOU FOR YOUR ONGOING BUSINESS. WE WISH YOU GOOD